Monthly Archives: February 2016

A crisis of Greek poetry before the poetry of the Greek crisis

  Since Greece in the 2010s reminds many commentators of the Weimar Republic in the 1920s, I believe we can learn a lot from the poets of both periods, and especially from their great collaborative projects, like those by Brecht and his … Continue reading

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The pianist as accompanist and as collaborator

I am fascinated by two very different performances of the same Greek song (Prosopika/Personally 1988)* with the same musicians: the singer Eleni Dimou and the composer Yiannis Spanos at the piano.  The musicians are the same but the role of … Continue reading

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The codes that friends share

Each friendship has its own unique codes. Friends share coded words, expressions, gestures, references, preferences, clothes. These codes are often public since they are meant to generate intensity and devotion, not secrecy and exclusion. The night Pantelis Polychronidis and I … Continue reading

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Pianist Dr. Pantelis Polychronidis performs with the two top winners of an international voice competition

In the 3 clips listed below Pantelis collaborates with mezzo soprano Raehann Bryce-Davis at the finals of the 9th International Hilde Zadek Competition for Voice at the Musikverein in Vienna in April 2015.  With these performances Ms. Raehann Bryce-Davis, a … Continue reading

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The Counter-Revolutionary Politics of Autonomist Disengagement

When modern radical politics stops investing in the messianic/apocalyptic prospect of a total Revolution, it usually adopts one of two attitudes or “moods”: either melancholy over the lost hope for emancipation, or indignation over a hopeless regime of oppression. A … Continue reading

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Notions of Left Defeat and Melancholy

This is a list-in-progress compiled as part of a double project to look at the innovative poetic production of the Greek generation of the 2000s, and 2. tragedies of the revolution in modern drama. (Terms and titles from English-language articles, … Continue reading

Posted in Disengagement, Left, Melancholy, Resistance, Revolt, Revolution

A funeral march for the Revolution

If approached from the literary background of its title, the 3rd movement of Mahler’s Symphony No. 1, Titan (premiered in 1889), intones a funeral march that haunts the Left Melancholy inspired by α procession burying the hopes and expectations of … Continue reading

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