Author Archives: Vassilis Lambropoulos

The regular piano collaborator

Long-term collaborations in classical music used to inspire confidence in the tradition of the genre. Whether we were listening to an LP or the local classical station, we the audience knew that the stability and continuity of several schemes guaranteed … Continue reading

Posted in Collaboration, Piano

“Anarchism and Hellenism in Richard Wagner’s Revolutionary Cultural Politics (1848-52)”

Richard Wagner is one of the seminal thinkers discussed in my book, The Tragic Idea (2006), which surveys the philosophy of the tragic from Schelling (1795) to Heidegger (1935).  Here is the original, longer version of that entry, which focuses … Continue reading

Posted in Classical Music, Collaboration, Culture, Hellenism, Revolution, The "Greeks" | Tagged

Theory in verse

Is there a difference between receiving and rendering? I have been transported by The Paths of Survival (2017), Josephine Balmer’s new poetry book, which traces the few surviving fragments of Aeschylus’ tragedy Myrmidons backwards across twenty-five centuries, from a contemporary … Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Greek Poetry, The "Greeks" | Tagged ,

The spell of caprice No. 24

Paganini 24 is not a piece you listen to but one you obsess about. Its theme alone hits you like this orchestral crescendo: So many composers and musicians have been obsessing about this five-minute capriccio (1817) that one may write … Continue reading

Posted in Music, Piano | Tagged

Anti-Hellenism (2)

Anti-Hellenism is a century-old taboo topic that scholars either avoid completely or treat as an irregular version of Philhellenism. Views and actions targeting the Greeks are folded into Philhellenism and marginalized as its aberrations. That is how anti-Hellenism is ignored … Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Greeks, Hellenism, The "Greeks"

Anti-Hellenism (1)

Why don’t we study anti-Hellenism? This question came again to my mind as I finished reading an excellent review essay by the Cambridge historian of classical reception Dr. Helen Roche, “The Peculiarities of German Philhellenism” (2017), which surveys studies published … Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Hellenism, Literature, The Arts | Tagged

Greek women poets on Greek myth

A new bilingual poetry collection, Phoebe Giannisi’s Homerica (2017), which has just appeared, brings to mind the growing number of Greek women writers of the poetic generation of the 2000s who have been publishing book-length cycles that draw explicitly and … Continue reading

Posted in Greek Poetry, Greeks, The "Greeks" | Tagged