Author Archives: Vassilis Lambropoulos

The pianist’s “divine madness”

Sequentia Cyclica (1948-49) is by any measure a demonic artwork.  One of the longest and arguably the most monumental piece of classical piano music, it is based on this theme, a version of the well-known Gregorian chant Dies irae: This … Continue reading

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Workshop on Translation and Classical Reception

At the three-day workshop below, I am speaking on Phoebe Giannisi’s performative “somatic philology” as applied to Archilochus. Translation & Classical Reception Studies: Workshop 2 (by invitation) Richard Armstrong & Alexandra Lianeri:  Organizers’ Introduction Our first workshop took place in … Continue reading

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Trivia games at the Times Literary Supplement

Who reads the TLS?  Who bothers with a weekly edited by the Stig Abells of British publishing?* I do not refer to the small minority of people from the periphery, like me, who are interested in ways in which a … Continue reading

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Piano recitals (2)

Some recitals offer an anthology of great autonomous works from the canonical repertoire.  Others place works in a sequence to narrate the grand story of a composer, genre, or tradition.  A more recent kind of recital assembles a variety of … Continue reading

Posted in Listening, Piano

Piano recitals (1)

Traditional piano recitals, both live and recorded, consisted in precocious and neurotic virtuosos performing anthologies of canonical compositions by precocious and neurotic geniuses.  This interpretive tradition has recently come to an end, together with its supportive critical and scholarly discourses … Continue reading

Posted in Classical Music, Listening, Piano

The Wandering Musician

Perhaps no other genre in classical music is as intensely Romantic as the Wanderlieder cycle, the song cycle depicting the adventurous peregrinations of a young wayfarer.*    Such cycles represent the epitome of 19th century male subject position as poet, composer, … Continue reading

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Heine & Schubert’s “Der Doppelgänger”

Franz Schubert’s seminal song “Der Doppelgänger” (1828) is suspended in a unique historical and stylistic moment of classical music, with its ostinato piano part looking back to Bach’s passacaglia and its declamatory vocal part looking forward to Wagner’s Sprechgesang.  It … Continue reading

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The protesters’ raised hands

Today, as riot police dispersed the last protesters in Seattle’s Capitol Hill Organized Protest area, which became an “autonomous zone” for the past two weeks as part of nation-wide protests against police brutality, images of the zone’s creation and operation … Continue reading

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Antonio Negri’s catechism of the revolutionary militant

Inspired by “learning plays” by Brecht and Müller, Negri wrote a “morality play,” Swarm, structured as a Way of the Cross of a revolutionary militant on his way to the common of a Franciscan multitude. 20 May 2020

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“Ο Μάρκος Μέσκος στον Μέλανα Δρυμό της ποιητικής”

Το τεύχος 86 (Μάρτιος 2020) των Σημειώσεων είναι αφιερωμένο στον Μάρκο Μέσκο.  Στη  συμμετοχή μου τονίζω πως ο Μέσκος και η υπόλοιπη παρέα του περιοδικού “κάνουν τη μεγάλη θεωρητική τομή στην ελληνική ποίηση στη δεκαετία του 1970 όταν με το … Continue reading

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