Category Archives: Literature

Schubert as a Byronic hero

Every time I start listening to Schubert’s Quartet No. 14, “Death and the Maiden” (1824), its opening fortissimo octaves stop me on my tracks: Did I really just hear that? And that is only the start! The tremendous, relentless contrasts … Continue reading

Posted in Classical Music, Literature, Melancholy | Tagged ,

“Neoliberal Austerity and Left Melancholy”

I have just published in the Michigan Quarterly Review a review essay on the anthology Austerity Measures: The New Greek Poetry (New York Review Books, 2017), edited by Karen Van Dyck.  It is fitting that Michigan’s C. P. Cavafy Modern … Continue reading

Posted in Collaboration, General Culture, Greek Poetry, Greeks, The Common

Χρόνος, Χάυντν, Χάιντεγγερ

Ο Δημήτρης Καλοκύρης, κορυφαία μορφή των ελληνικών γραμμάτων, τεχνών και εκδόσεων, ζήτησε από 40 συνεργάτες και συνομιλητές του να σχολιάσουν με λίγα λόγια ορισμένους από τους 88 καταπληκτικούς εικαστικούς Ωρολογιακούς Μηχανισμούς (2017) που πρόσφατα δημιούργησε, εξέθεσε και εξέδωσε.  Αυτό είναι … Continue reading

Posted in Classical Music, Greek Poetry | Tagged ,

Learning Greek

Having discussed in my previous post Zimmermann’s Musique pour les soupers du Roi Ubu, an orchestral composition consisting solely of musical quotes and running through an entire canon, I thought I might also mention a poem consisting solely of verse … Continue reading

Posted in Greek Poetry, Greeks

Theory in verse

Is there a difference between receiving and rendering? I have been transported by The Paths of Survival (2017), Josephine Balmer’s new poetry book, which traces the few surviving fragments of Aeschylus’ tragedy Myrmidons backwards across twenty-five centuries, from a contemporary … Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Greek Poetry, The "Greeks" | Tagged ,

Anti-Hellenism (1)

Why don’t we study anti-Hellenism? This question came again to my mind as I finished reading an excellent review essay by the Cambridge historian of classical reception Dr. Helen Roche, “The Peculiarities of German Philhellenism” (2017), which surveys studies published … Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Hellenism, Literature, The Arts | Tagged

Greek women poets on Greek myth

A new bilingual poetry collection, Phoebe Giannisi’s Homerica (2017), which has just appeared, brings to mind the growing number of Greek women writers of the poetic generation of the 2000s who have been publishing book-length cycles that draw explicitly and … Continue reading

Posted in Greek Poetry, Greeks, The "Greeks" | Tagged