Category Archives: Crisis

The agonistic politics of eris, stasis, polemos

Questions of contest, strife, division, and war have been central to my autonomist politics.*  These questions have been circulating in my research explicitly since the 1980s. Here is a representative passage from my paper “The Rule of Justice” (1993): We … Continue reading

Posted in Autonomy, Crisis | Tagged ,

“Η αριστερή μελαγχολία στην ελληνική ποιητική γενιά του 2000”

Below is the Greek translation of my paper “Left Melancholy in the Greek Poetry Generation of 2000s after the Crisis of Revolution and Representation” (2016), published in the literary magazine Thraka 8 (Summer 2017). Επισυνάπτω μετάφραση περσινής αγγλόγλωσσης μελέτης μου … Continue reading

Posted in Crisis, General Culture, Greek Poetry, Left, Melancholy

“Πώς μιλάμε για την καινούργια ελληνική ποίηση”

Μια διαφορετική προσέγγιση στο μείζον λογοτεχνικό φαινόμενο του ελληνικού 21ου αιώνα: πώς τοποθετούμε, διαπραγματευόμαστε και διαχειριζόμαστε την ποίηση του 2000. Με αφορμή την κυκλοφορία του νέου τεύχους του περιοδικού Θράκα, του οποίου το περιεχόμενο (μελέτες, δοκίμια και ποίηση) είναι ουσιαστικά αφιερωμένο … Continue reading

Posted in Crisis, Culture, Greek Literature, Greek Poetry, Left, Melancholy, The Common

The Greek poetry of austerity on German radio

German-Greek journalist Alkyoni Karamanolis, a member of “Global Correspondents,” interviewed writer Katerina Iliopoulou and me (in Greek, in Athens) for a German radio program she produced on the new Greek poetry. The program aired on July 20 under the title “Poetry … Continue reading

Posted in Crisis, Greek Poetry, Greeks

How critical theory arrived in Greek writing through poetry

My interview to “Reading Greece” on New Greek Poetry and Modern Greek Studies June 27, 2017

Posted in Crisis, Greek Literature, Greek Poetry, Greeks, Hellenism, Left, Melancholy

The Counter-Revolutionary Politics of Autonomist Disengagement

When modern radical politics stops investing in the messianic/apocalyptic prospect of a total Revolution, it usually adopts one of two attitudes or “moods”: either melancholy over the lost hope for emancipation, or indignation over a hopeless regime of oppression. A … Continue reading

Posted in Autonomy, Crisis, Disengagement, General Philosophy, Left, Revolt, Revolution, The Common