Category Archives: Music

The spell of caprice No. 24

Paganini 24 is not a piece you listen to but one you obsess about. Its theme alone hits you like this orchestral crescendo: So many composers and musicians have been obsessing about this five-minute capriccio (1817) that one may write … Continue reading

Posted in Music, Piano | Tagged

Is serialism a classicism?

Why would classical art bring to mind twelve-tone composition? Writing to friends after a six-day, two-concert visit to London in May 1933, Anton Webern exclaimed: “I also saw the Parthenon Frieze! I stood there for an hour and a half. … Continue reading

Posted in Classical Music, Hellenism

Three years of blogging about listening to music and poetry

Trifonov walks swiftly on the stage, bows to us, his audience, sits down, touches the piano … and Pantelis starts to play: I can hear immediately his distinct touch on the keys. This is how our friendship works.  Today, 3 … Continue reading

Posted in Attunement, Friends, Listening

Modes of reading

The more familiar a piece of music, the more I am fascinated by the interpretive claims made on it by the musicologist, the performer, the listener, the recording engineer, the advertiser, the anthologist and many others involved in its circulation. … Continue reading

Posted in Classical Music, Literature

Collaborative listening

The major Modernist auditory regime was Adorno’s “structural hearing” where the expert listener “understands what he perceives as necessary” (Introduction to the Sociology of Music [1976], 4-5) while the great work is listening to its fallen singularity. Composers, performers, and … Continue reading

Posted in Collaboration, Friends, Listening | Tagged

The Friend and his Beloved

When a close friend talks to me about love in their lives, the world is suspended, and for a while nothing else matters. Pantelis often talks to me with melodic tenderness about the woman of his dreams. He describes her … Continue reading

Posted in Friends, Music

Friends making Music together (2)

Dr. Pantelis Polychronidis is a consummate collaborative pianist: He does not accompany fellow musicians but actively works with them to create new music, unique compositions that have not been heard before. This is especially evident in his meticulous work with … Continue reading

Posted in Classical Music, Collaboration