Category Archives: Philosophy

“Modernist Theory & Theater between the Tragic & the Melancholic”

Here is a video of two lectures at the University of Michigan in dialogue on modern tragedy:  the brilliant Ian Balfour (English, York) focuses on Shakespeare’s Hamlet while I focus on the tragedy that has been called Luigi Pirandello’s Hamlet, … Continue reading

Posted in Disengagement, Literature, Melancholy, Resistance | Tagged , , ,

The listening self

Musicians do not play an instrument.  They are using instruments to play their body.  They resonate instruments in the echo chamber of their reverberating body. In attending or watching live performances, I have learned to listen not to the interpretation, … Continue reading

Posted in Attunement, Classical Music, Collaboration, Friends, Listening

“Greek Democracy in Crisis or Stasis”

“The decade of the Greek 2010s may be understood in two very different ways, both of them based on Leftist views of the explosive December of 2008: Either in terms of a biopolitical crisis whose victims need the government΄s pastoral … Continue reading

Posted in Autonomy, Crisis, Culture, Friends, Greek Literature, Greek Poetry, Left, Melancholy, Revolt, The Common

“Η ελληνική ποιητική γενιά του 2000”: Mιά συνέντευξή μου στη ‘Βαβυλωνία’

“Αντί η ποιητική γενιά του 2000 να πενθήσει τη χαμένη επανάσταση, προτίμησε να μείνει πιστή στο αριστερό πρόταγμα της αυτονομίας και στην ιστορική ρήξη της εξέγερσης.  Έτσι καλλιέργησε μια ριζοσπαστικοποίηση του στίχου προς αναρχίζουσες κατευθύνσεις.  Οι καινούργιοι ποιητές απορρίπτουν την … Continue reading

Posted in Collaboration, Crisis, Culture, Greek Poetry, Left, Melancholy, The Common | Tagged

The tragedy of revolution is that liberation conspires with terror.

A link to my scholarly project The Tragedy of Revolution: “A tragic understanding admits that revolution is subject to counter-revolution, that liberation is risking oppression.”

Posted in Melancholy, Philosophy, Revolution

Schubert as a Byronic hero

Every time I start listening to Schubert’s Quartet No. 14, “Death and the Maiden” (1824), its opening fortissimo octaves stop me on my tracks: Did I really just hear that? And that is only the start! The tremendous, relentless contrasts … Continue reading

Posted in Classical Music, Literature, Melancholy | Tagged ,

Pirandello’s “Enrico IV,” a tragedy of refusal

Luigi Pirandello’s tragedy, Enrico IV (1922), is a great post-modern Hamlet. I discuss its politics of refusal in terms of melancholic disengagement and destituent power in a chapter of my book-length scholarly project on the self-destruction of revolution since Romantic theater.

Posted in Disengagement, Melancholy, The Arts | Tagged